Writing Without Regrets

It has been brought home to me of late the fragility of life and how little time we actually have in this world.

A few weeks ago, my only remaining grandparent, my dad’s mom, passed away at the age of 81.

Last night, one of my best friend’s grandma’s was given less than 48 hours to live.

Working in the medical field, death is something I see almost every day. In the past six months, at least two dozen of the people I treated as a physical therapist in the hospital passed away, many of whom I’d gotten to know.

Dwelling on death can be crippling, but it’s also made me realize I shouldn’t have any regrets. Eighty-one seems young to me, since I see many people live far past that age. On the other hand, I’ve known too many people who’ve passed far short of that age.

I’ve decided to take on a new stance regarding my writing due to all this personal experience with death lately: I shall not regret a word I’ve written, good or bad, positive or negative. Every bit of my writing has shaped me into the creative artist I am today.

What about you? Do you regret anything you’ve written?

Happy writing, my friends.

 

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

“It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited, and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things.”
Lemony Snicket, Horseradish

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7 thoughts on “Writing Without Regrets

  1. Love this post. I’ve been struggling lately to appreciate my first-draft-ness for what it is–a rough sketch and not a finished product. The not-so-good writing is just as vital a part of the process as the polishing, and it’s important to not regret or resent it. Thanks for being inspiring, as always! Hugs to you!

  2. I always enjoy what you write. And it’s interesting that you’re writing on death. Recently, I came across Stephen Jenkinson, an MSW who teaches, writes and lectures in what he calls the “death trade.” He’s director of a hospice and began a children’s hospice and has written a book on being a “griefwalker.” This is some of the best stuff I’ve ever heard on death. You can find him on YouTube.

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